Cleanse & Bless Your Home with a Sage Smudging Ceremony

A smudging ceremony is a Native American ritual that you can easily do in your own home. It removes negative energy immediately and also odors! Download our free instructions sheet and try it for yourself! It’s a wonderful way to make your home feel good.

NOTE:  Smudging, in and of itself, is a very special and sacred ritual in the Native American community. It can only be done by a priest ordained to perform the ceremony. This post is not intended to copy that but rather to pull a very small piece of it and share the power of  it. Smudging in this case is is simply herbs removing negative energy.

A smudging ceremony is a Native American ritual that you can easily do in your own home. It removes negative energy immediately and also odors! Download our free instructions sheet and try it for yourself! It’s a wonderful way to make your home feel good. A smudging ceremony is a Native American ritual that has a spiritual and practical use.  Roy’s grandparents were Native American, and like the people themselves, Roy has a strong  love and respect for nature and the earth. Smudging fits right in. It is a type of blessing where you spread herbal smoke throughout an area to cleanse it. The idea is that it clears out negative energy. It also gets rid of old stale odors. When we move into a new home we always smudge it. Whether its psychological or not it always feels so much better afterwards and gives the house a nice earthy smell!  (We will also smudge the home about once a year after moving in.) It’s very simple to do. You take some white sage that’s bound together and light it, blow it out and then while thinking good thoughts walk clockwise around the perimeter of each room gently waving the smoking sage. You need to keep one window or door open in each room you’re smudging to allow the  smoke to dissipate and the “old energy” to leave. Herbs and matches are all that is required though there are extras items you can use to make it more ceremonial in nature.  I made my own little kit that holds all my smudging items. I have very fine clean white sand inside a large abalone shell which I then use to extinguish  the smudge stick when I’m done. (A smudge stick can be used over and over.) I keep it my supplies in a fancy pencil box that I labeled.

A smudging ceremony is a Native American ritual that you can easily do in your own home. It removes negative energy immediately and also odors! Download our free instructions sheet and try it for yourself! It’s a wonderful way to make your home feel good.

It’s also a wonderful way to teach children about other cultures. In the past I’ve had our granddaughter Alyssa Mae smudge our home for me. I’d start the herbs smoldering then give the bundle to her. She really enjoyed learning about the meaning behind it and then going from room to room following the directions I gave her.

I’ve created a free downloadable pdf  below with all the instructions on how to smudge your home. There is also a list of supplies you can use to make your own kit. There are many ways to bring positive loving energy into your home. This is just one of them.

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Smudging Ceremony Supplies

  • White Sage (This herb is best for the purpose.)
  • Wood Matches (Used because they are more natural than book matches.)
  • Large abalone shell &  stand (optional)
  • Clean sand for extinguishing sage. (optional)
  • Pencil box or other container. (optional)

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blank300x23If you enjoyed Smudging you’ll love our Burning Bowl Ceremony!
Let go of all the stuff that’s holding you back & start the New Year fresh with a fun burning bowl ceremony! Download our printable kit & instructions.

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Downloadable Instructions

Printable Smudging Instructions

Smudging is a Native American ceremony that you can easily do in your own home. It removes negative energy immediately and also odors! Download our free instructions sheet and try it for yourself! It’s a wonderful way to make your home feel good.

Though free, a donation is always welcome.
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Actual Use of White Sage to Smudge a Home

Roy using the smudge stick in our current home.

A smudging ceremony is a Native American ritual that you can easily do in your own home. It removes negative energy immediately and also odors! Download our free instructions sheet and try it for yourself! It’s a wonderful way to make your home feel good.

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A smudging ceremony is a Native American ritual that you can easily do in your own home. It removes negative energy immediately and also odors! Download our free instructions sheet and try it for yourself! It’s a wonderful way to make your home feel good.

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My Kit

A smudging ceremony is a Native American ritual that you can easily do in your own home. It removes negative energy immediately and also odors! Download our free instructions sheet and try it for yourself! It’s a wonderful way to make your home feel good.

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A smudging ceremony is a Native American ritual that you can easily do in your own home. It removes negative energy immediately and also odors! Download our free instructions sheet and try it for yourself! It’s a wonderful way to make your home feel good.

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  A smudging ceremony is a Native American ritual that you can easily do in your own home. It removes negative energy immediately and also odors! Download our free instructions sheet and try it for yourself! It’s a wonderful way to make your home feel good.

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A smudging ceremony is a Native American ritual that you can easily do in your own home. It removes negative energy immediately and also odors! Download our free instructions sheet and try it for yourself! It’s a wonderful way to make your home feel good.

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15 Comments

  1. This was very interesting! And it sounds like a nice ritual. Maybe to use when you moved into a new house and want to make it your home… Pinned!
    I am stopping by from the Pin Me Linky Party.
    Thank you for teaching me something new!

    Reply
  2. My husband has distant Cherokee roots as well and we have been doing this for years, I’m a firm believer that homes retain energy from previous residents good or bad and it’s a wonderful way to help cleanse negative energy.

    Reply
    1. Nancy Author

      That’s so awesome Brenda! We very much agree with your thoughts on that. Some places you walk into you can just “feel” the energy of it whether its negative OR positive! Thanks so much for stopping by and for commenting!

      Reply
  3. I love your post about smudging! Saw it on the Happiness is Homemade link party and wanted to read it. I smudge often. My dogs love when I smudge as they follow me all through the house while I’m conducting my cleansing. By their actions, I believe the whole thing comforts them. Everything always feels lighter once I’m done.

    Reply
  4. Jenna

    Hello,

    Beautifully written article but I’d just like to inform you that these Native American practices are part of a closed religion/culture. Unless you are a member of a tribe, born into or adopted by one, misappropriation of their practices is highly offensive. The concept of closed religions/cultures is unfamiliar to most people, but taking practices from these oppressed cultures is far too common. Smudging, for example, is a spiritual practice done by a Native American priest who has been trained and ordained to do so. Also I’d like to add that white sage is endangered!!!!!!! So PLEASE use other herbs/incense..
    I don’t mean any offense, just to inform and prevent. Thanks

    Reply
    1. Nancy Author

      Hello Jenna!

      I had replied to your comment and it magically disappeared into the nether. Anyway, I wanted to thank you for your comments. It’s never my intention to copy something sacred or disrespect a culture. Particularly that one. My goal was to pull a small piece from it to inspire and help others. I’ve smudged my home for years and I can attest to the power of it… which basically comes from the specific type of herbs used which clear negative energy, and then putting forth love while it’s done. I had no idea about white sage. I’ll have to read up on that myself.

      Anyway thank you for comments. I’m going to go over that post and see if I can reword things or add and note.
      Have a wonderful week!
      Nancy Ü

      Reply
    2. Leann

      Firstly, I would like to point out that the practice of smudging is not strictly a Native American/First Nations spiritual practice. Smudging existed for thousands of years in Asia, Africa, and the middle East to name a few long before Europeans came to North America. I have several family members who married into the family with Native ancestry. Although I am ‘white’ of European decent I have cousins and uncles of Native heritage, my Godfather is of Algonquin decent and identifies as such. The statement that Native American practices are part of a “closed religion/culture” made me all but laugh out loud. I have never known any Native person to consider themselves or their religion “closed” to anybody. Period. I personally have found Native people very welcoming and open with their culture regardless of whether one could be considered an outsider (non-native, not adopted into, …what is this trash?) Smudging is an act of prayer for spiritual cleansing and healing. Nobody has the right to tell anyone what religion they are allowed to practice, what to believe or shame them for not meeting someone else’s standards of belonging. Would a person dare to tell a Catholic they were not entitled to pray because they were not ordained by the church? You have to be a priest to pray? Essentially, this is what is being said by the poster ‘Jenna’. On the issue of the “endangered” white sage. White sage is like any other herb, grown and cultivated. People can buy the seeds and grow these plants in their own back yards. Native people themselves cultivate and process these sacred smudging herbs to share with the world. Endangered-it is not. So let’s not get side tracked and make statements that the practice of smudging is “highly offensive” to the Native American culture and stolen or misappropriated from an historically oppressed people. Yes, what was done to the Native people by the Europeans was horrendous. It was done to them, NOT by them. Natives shared much of their culture with European settlers willingly and openly as they still do to this day. Perhaps it is Jenna that should work on being more open and accepting within her own person and refrain from making oppressive statements herself that would speak for the modern Native people of North America in it’s entirety.

      Reply

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